Antique Roses in my garden

Antique Roses are generally considered heritage species roses that have been found in the wild, often originally from eastern Asia, including China and Japan and have been the parents or grandparents of our more modern roses. They have beautiful foliage, colourful canes, stems, leaves and autumn rosehips. Often they are powerfully armed with thorns like Rosa ‘pimpinellifolia’.

Rosa pimpinellifolia 'Glory of Edzell'
Rosa pimpinellifolia ‘Glory of Edzell’
Rosa pimpinellifolia 'Glory of Edzell'
Rosa pimpinellifolia ‘Glory of Edzell’ is very attractive to bees and wildlife.

Among the species roses are the Rugosa roses, Gallicas, Damasks, Portlands, Bourbons and Albas. They often only have one annual flowering in spring but this is followed by wonderful autumn colour on foliage and magnificent displays of rose hips. You hardly have to look after them, simply take pride in being able to trip their names off your tongue to visitors “Oh, do let me introduce you to my special friends Roseraie de l’Hay or Rosa sericea subsp.omeiensis ‘Atrosanguinea’.”  Do try them! Here are some that grow well in my garden.

Rosa Mutabilis, its’ common name is “The Butterfly Rose”, a name which you understand at once when you see it in flower as it’s single crepe like petals open pale yellow, changing through orange to a rich pink and finally crimson often showing these stages all at once looking as if a flock of multi-colored butterflies has settled on it. In my garden where it has grown for six years it is a small delicate bush with dark reddish bronze branches of no more than 60 -70cm, but apparently ‘Mutabilis’ will grow to 2m. I have never pruned these bushes as I look forward to the tiny hips in autumn.

Rosa x odorata 'Mutabilis'
Rosa x odorata ‘Mutabilis’
Rosa x odorata 'Mutabilis'
Rosa x odorata ‘Mutabilis’

Rosa ‘Portlandica’  or the Portland rose, although named in 1782 after the Duchess of Portland it is thought to be a much older rose originating in the Italian region of Paestum and possibly to be the rose that appears on the garden frescos at Pompeii. In the centre of the bright red, semi-double, well scented flowers a burst yellow stamens shine forth. The plant has dense foliage and grows to 90cm. As this rose can have flowers and rose hips at the same time in autumn, I give them a short haircut in spring after the first blooms – removing 80% of the first blooms just passed.

Rosa 'Portlandica'
Rosa ‘Portlandica’ also known as the Portland Rose

Rosa Rugosa originaly thought to be from China, it is the parent to many wonderful plants including ‘Fru Dagmar Hastrup’ and the Grootendorst cultivars. By far it’s most wonderful features are the very large cherry tomato sized hips (always organic of course) from which can be made many wonderful and healthy (they have much more vitamin C than oranges) jams and vinegars or I even use it in an apricot facial oil. At the very least you can dry a few bunches of hips and have some lovely tea through autumn and winter.

Rosa rugosa
Rosa rugosa -The sweetly scented flowers are used to make pot-pourri in Japan and China, where it has been cultivated for about a thousand years.
Rosa rugosa from the 1820 Rosarum monographica
Rosa rugosa from the 1820 Rosarum monographica
Rosa Grootendorst Supreme
Rosa Grootendorst Supreme This is a beautiful, vigorous, bushy plant and it is a profuse bloomer with deep crimson-red, fringed flowers that are produced in clusters continuously throughout the summer.

Here are some other old roses that I grow and can recommend. Many of these are perfect if you are planning a medieval or herb garden. I also think that some of the very wild ones like ‘Atrosanguinea’ would look well in ultra modern gardens , contrasting with stone and concrete.

Rosa 'Dupontii'
Rosa ‘Dupontii’

 

Rosa 'Frau Karl Druschki'
‘Frau Karl Druschki’ is a hardy, hybrid perpetual rose producing high centered, fully double, milk-white flowers with strong, arching stems and mid-green leaves. Also known as Reine des Neiges
Rosa hugonis
Also known as the Father Hugo Rose or the Golden Rose of China. Single yellow blossoms cover this bush in early spring. Ferny foliage on thin, brown, arching canes makes this a nice background shrub. Very hardy and drought resistant which makes it perfect for the Melbourne climate right now.
Rosa sericea subsp.omeiensis 'Atrosanguinea'
Rosa sericea subsp.omeiensis ‘Atrosanguinea’
Rosa sericea subsp.omeiensis 'Atrosanguinea'
Rosa sericea subsp.omeiensis ‘Atrosanguinea’
Rosa Souvenir de Philemon Cochet
Rosa Souvenir de Philemon Cochet. This rose is a sport of the lovely Rugosa Blanc Double de Cobert. The flowers are white, very double and very fragrant. It is a tall rose to approx 2 m and flowers recurrently during summer. 1899
Rosa x odorata 'Viridiflora'
Rosa x odorata ‘Viridiflora’
Rosa xanthina 'Canary Bird'
Rosa xanthina ‘Canary Bird’
Rosa xanthina 'Canary Bird'
Rosa xanthina ‘Canary Bird’

Here I have included some lovely prints from the “Rosarum Monographia” 1820 which would look lovely framed. This book also goes into much depth about the origins of many of the roses mentioned here (you can read it online).
rosarum mong Rosarum monographica plate 1 Rosarum monographica plate 2 Rosarum monographica plate 3 Rosarum monographica plate 4 Rosarum monographica plate 5

Rosa Belle Poitevine
Rosa Belle Poitevine
Rosa 'Coryana'
Rosa ‘Coryana’
Rosa corymbifera
Rosa corymbifera

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close